Monday, May 18, 2009

PBL, Creativity, and the Contextual Reality

An Authentic Curriculum


As I have mentioned in earlier posts, I am working hard to develop a curriculum that “Get[s] Past Teaching Apps [and helping students] Build and Use a Student Technology Toolbelt“ (Cool Cat).  This focus is defined in my curriculum in terms of  students’ technology fluency, which is defined in Cool Cat’s post as:
the ability to determine and use the appropriate technology tool(s) for the task at hand in a manner that allows seamless transfer of created objects and documents to flow easily between the selected tools without outside intervention.

I also want students to be able to think critically and solve problems within a computing environment since things keep changing. As Cool Cat notes and Karl Fisch supports, “We cannot fathom what the future holds for them but we know what it won’t hold: It won’t hold the software that we taught them this year in its present fashion.”

Wednesday, May 13, 2009

That's the problem with streaming media...

Okay,

So I feel like I'm always ranting.  I go forever without posting, and then something annoys me, and I go off. I'm really sorry about that... really... I am.  Sometime soon, I'll write a non-ranting post.  Today, however, the Juvinalian Muse is upon me.

The Quest for Authentic Instruction & Fluency Building


In designing my current curriculum for CIT, I was heavily influenced by Cool Cat's post, "Get Past Teaching Apps: Build and Use a Student Technology Toolbelt".  I am particularly interested in building my students' technology fluency, which is defined in Cool Cat's post as:
the ability to determine and use the appropriate technology tool(s) for the task at hand in a manner that allows seamless transfer of created objects and documents to flow easily between the selected tools without outside intervention.

I also want students to be able to think critically and solve problems within a computing environment.  I focus quite a bit on teaching the students to use the skills I use personally to master computer applications, rather than just teaching them what I know.  As Cool Cat notes and Karl Fisch supports, "We cannot fathom what the future holds for them but we know what it won't hold: It won't hold the software that we taught them this year in its present fashion."